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VOLUME 15 , ISSUE 2 ( March-April, 2022 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Eating Disorders among Children and Adolescents Engaged in Sports: A Cross-sectional Study

Mridula Goswami, Gyanendra Kumar, Aditi Garg

Keywords : Anorexia nervosa, Binge eating disorder, Bulimia nervosa, Eating disorder

Citation Information : Goswami M, Kumar G, Garg A. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Eating Disorders among Children and Adolescents Engaged in Sports: A Cross-sectional Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2022; 15 (2):135-142.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10005-2116

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 01-04-2022

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2022; The Author(s).


Abstract

Aim and objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding eating disorders among children and adolescents, engaged in sports. Materials and methods: A total sample of 650 children was recruited and further divided into two groups on the basis of age. Group, I comprised of children and adolescents between 10–14 years of age and Group II between 15–18 years of age. A self-instructed open ended questionnaire was used in English and Hindi. The sports included were Basketball, Yoga, Wrestling, Judo, Cricket, Gymnastics, Boxing, Badminton, Table Tennis and others based on the availability of children in each sport. Result: The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice of Bulimia nervosa in Group I was 0.228 ± 0.41, 2.69 ± 0.586, and 0.000, respectively. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice of Anorexia nervosa in Group I was 4.76 ± 1.2, 0.22 ± 0.41, and 1.17 ± 0.908. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice of Binge eating disorders in Group I was 0.22 ± 0.41, 1.65 ± 0.50, and 0.18 ± 0.39, respectively. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice of Bulimia nervosa in Group II were 3.717 ± 1.21, 0.34 ± 0.56, and 0.145 ± 0.35. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice of Anorexia nervosa in Group II were 5.26 ± 1.17, 0.34 ± 0.56, and 1.12 ± 0.85. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice of Binge eating disorders in Group II were 0.34 ± 0.56, 1.76 ± 0.42, and 0.28 ± 0.60. Conclusion: The likely chance of developing an eating disorder and habits practiced related to Bulimia nervosa and Anorexia nervosa was found higher among adolescents between 15–18 years of age. However, these findings were found similar for Binge eating disorders among both age groups.


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