International Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry

Register      Login

VOLUME 3 , ISSUE 3 ( September-December, 2010 ) > List of Articles

SURVEY

Prevalence of Oral Mucosal and Extraoral Lesions among Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Patients Attending to a Private Hospital, India

Ajithkrishnan CG, Kiran V Hegde, Sudheer Hongal, Gururaj Patil

Citation Information : CG A, V Hegde K, Hongal S, Patil G. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal and Extraoral Lesions among Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Patients Attending to a Private Hospital, India. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2010; 3 (3):189-194.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10005-1075i

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 00-00-0000


Abstract

Aim of the Study : To assess the prevalence of oral mucosal and extraoral lesions among the cleft lip and/or palate subjects aged between 3 and 18 years, and to compare with those of noncleft controls. Methodology : A cross sectional survey was conducted during the period of March 2004 to September 2004. A select sample of 150 cases consisted of cleft lip and/or palate subjects aged between 3 and 18 years reporting to Outpatient Department, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, private Hospital and Medical Research Center, Belgaum. A sample of 450 matched noncleft subjects (Controls) was selected based on convenience from general population. Oral health assessment form as prescribed in Basic Oral Health Surveys, WHO, was used to record the data. Results : Approximately 43% of cleft subjects had abnormalities of upper lip. 7% of clefts and 5% of noncleft controls presented enlarged lymph nodes on palpation in the head and neck region. Both the cleft subjects and noncleft controls had ulcerations in the buccal mucosa. However, there was no significant difference between them. Among few cleft subjects abscess formation was observed in the sulcus region (1.33%) as well as gingiva (2.66%) adjacent to cleft. Similarly among controls also few abscess in sulcus and gingival region were observed. Conclusions : On intra-and extraoral examination of cleft and noncleft subjects for any lesions revealed that clefts as well as noncleft subjects exhibited few intraoral lesions, however clinically or statistically significant differences were not observed.


PDF Share
  1. Turvey TA, Katherine WL Vig, Fonseca RJ. Facial Clefts and Craniosynostosis, Principles and Management. London: WB Saunders Inc; 1996
  2. The Cleft Palate Story. 1st ed. Chicago: Quintessence Company Inc; 1994. p. 219
  3. Rehabilitation of Complex Palate and Craniomaxillofacial Defects–the Challenge of Bauru. Chicago: Quintessence Publishing Company Inc; 1999. p. 136
  4. Oral Health Survey’s Basic Methods [Internet]. 4th ed. WHO, Geneva 1999
  5. Gifting Smiles. India’S National Magazine [Internet]. [cited 2001 Jan-Feb]. Available from: http://www. hinduonnet.com/fline/fl1802/18020820.htm [access date 15th Feb 2005]. Vol. 18, Issue No 2
  6. Impact of cleft lip and/or palate on nutritional health and oral-motor development. Dent Clin North Am 2003 Apr;47(2):305-317
  7. Incidence of cleft lip, cleft palate, cleft lip and cleft palate among races: A review. Cleft Palate J 1987 Jul;24(3): 216-225
  8. The incidence of oral clefts: A review. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1996 Dec;34(6):488-494
  9. Caries experience and oral health behavior in Chinese children with cleft lip and/ or palate. Pediatr Dent 2001 Sep-Oct;23(5):431-434
  10. Caries, gingivitis and dental abnormalities in preschool children with cleft lip and/or palate. Cleft Palate J 1989 Jul;26(3);233-237.
PDF Share

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.