International Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry

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VOLUME 14 , ISSUE 2 ( March-April, 2021 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Comparison between Conventional, Game-based, and Self-made Storybook-based Oral Health Education on Children\'s Oral Hygiene Status: A Prospective Cohort Study

Shivangi Sharma, Smriti Saxena, Sathyajith N Naik, Ravi Bhandari, Anuj Kishor Shukla, Puneet Gupta

Keywords : Health education, Oral hygiene status, Schoolchildren, Storybooks

Citation Information : Sharma S, Saxena S, Naik SN, Bhandari R, Shukla AK, Gupta P. Comparison between Conventional, Game-based, and Self-made Storybook-based Oral Health Education on Children\'s Oral Hygiene Status: A Prospective Cohort Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2021; 14 (2):273-277.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10005-1811

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 30-07-2021

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2021; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction: Dental caries is the most widespread disease affecting children worldwide. The reason for this increased prevalence is the use of more processed foods and beverages with the addition of refined sugars. General health affects oral health and its maintenance is of great importance. Lifestyle modifications and habits are formed at an early age therefore health education plays an important role in educating them about the prevention of problems related to oral health. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess and compare the effectiveness of conventional method, game-based and storybook-based oral health education on the oral hygiene status among 7–12-year-old schoolchildren. Purpose: To assess and compare the effectiveness of conventional method, game-based and storybook-based oral health education on the oral hygiene status among 7–12-year-old schoolchildren. Materials and methods: A total of 300 children aged 7–12 years were divided into 3 groups. Each group had 100 children which were randomly assigned to each of the three groups. In group I, oral health education with the help of conventional method using educative posters was given to children once daily for a week. In group II, oral health education was imparted to children through play method (i.e., snakes and ladders game combined with flash cards) followed by group III, in which children were given education through self-made storybooks. The oral hygiene of all the children was estimated through Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified Debris (DI-S) score at day 1 and after 3 months after intervention. Results: In group III, storybooks showed maximum reduction in debris score which was found to be highly statistically significant followed by game based (group II) and conventional method (group I) of oral health education. Conclusion: The reduction in debris score was seen maximum in group III (storybooks). Hence, the use of storybooks should be encouraged for educating children regarding basic oral health concepts. Clinical significance: There is important need to understand differences in the mental cognitive ability of the children at different ages and the need to develop different intervention programs for different age-groups. Rationalizing reading can be an intelligent initiative toward the development of good oral habits and transforming the outlook of oral healthcare system in years to come.


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